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Learn Your Carrots : Understanding Horse Price Figures


horse and carrot


Many people in the horse industry use price figures when posting In Search Of (ISO) or sales ads. Prices range from four to six figures, broken down into low, low-mid, mid, mid-high, and high categories.


The reasons for using price figures instead of specific amounts vary. Some professionals, particularly those who use social media platforms like Facebook groups for buying and selling horses, avoid mentioning prices directly due to page rules. In addition, some individuals prefer not to commit to a particular amount or want to keep their pricing discreet. That is why people often opt for using figures or the carrot emoji to represent their budget or horse's price.


The problem with using figures or carrots is that there really isn’t a standard number range. This can cause confusion, frustration, and wasted time for both buyers and sellers.


So if you've ever wondered about what figure equates to what number, here's your comprehensive guide. Keep in mind that these ranges may vary slightly, but overall, it's a reliable reference when buying and selling horses.



Four Figures


If you see an ISO or sales post for four figures, that means the budget or price can be anywhere from $1,000 to $9,999. Unlike the five and six figures, you typically do not see postings for low-mid and mid-high in the four figures since there is not much variation. However, I have included them as an FYI. Here's the breakdown.


Low fours

$1,000-$4,000


Low-mid fours

$2,500-$4,000


Mid fours

$4,000-$7,000


Mid-high fours

$6,000-$7,500


High fours

$7,000-$9,999


Five Figures


If you see an ISO or sales post for four figures, that means the budget or price can be anywhere from $10,000 to $99,999. Here's the breakdown.


Low fives

$10,000-$25,000


Low-mid five

$25,000-$40,000


Mid fives

$40,000-$60,000


Mid-high fives

$60,000-$75,000


High fives

$75,000-$99,999


Six Figures


This may be the widest range of all of the figures, but if you see an ISO or sales post for four figures, that means the budget or price can be anywhere from $100,000 to $999,999. Here's the breakdown.


Low sixes

$100,000-$250,000


Low-mid sixes

$250,000-$400,000


Mid sixes

$400,000-$600,000


Mid-high sixes

$600,000-$750,000


High sixes

$750,000-$999,999


When you post a six figure ISO or sales ad online, you'll usually see listings for low, mid, and high sixes, which typically include the first digit of the range (e.g., low sixes starting with a 1). In cases where the budget or sales price is significant, terms like "budget dependent on quality" or "please inquire" may be used. However, I find that it's uncommon to find horses at the higher end of this range advertised online. Usually the higher priced six figure horses are sourced from private sales or connections.


It's important as an equestrian to know your figures.


Don't be the individual who mistakenly considers $10,000 as high four figures. Be the one who recognizes that $10,000 falls into the price range of "lowest of low fives." Understanding the correct figures used in equine pricing allows you to read beyond the carrots, have informed discussions, and create accurate ISO or sales posts.

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